Saturday, 24 October 2009

SOME LITTLE LANGUAGE FOIBLES . . .

You know how when you're talking to someone and realise they say a certain phrase often in conversation? For example, I have a friend who uses "at the end of the day" a lot, or people who throw in "like" randomly at the end of a sentence, appropos of nothing.

Today I was trying to explain the plot of the awesome "Flash Forward" to a friend at lunchtime and realised that I use the word "obviously" a RIDICULOUS amount. In fact, I actually caught myself doing it a couple of minutes later and before I finished whatever I was saying I had to interrupt myself and say "Oh My God, how much do I use the word 'obviously' when I'm talking? And most of the stuff I'm saying ISN'T obvious!!!" I need to try and curb that habit.

In addition to this, I also think I've been spending wayyyyyy too much time in the blogosphere because I find myself saying and writing things I'm certainly not picking up from the side of the big pond we call the Atlantic that I'm on.

Prime example - "ass". Over here, we say "arse". "Today I just want to sit on my arse." "Nice arse." "Can't be arsed". But I've started replacing this with "ass". One of my friends picked up on it the other day, so I must be doing it quite a lot.

Other Americanisms (I think! They certainly ain't SCOTTISH things to say or write) I have been relying heavily on:

"Period" (as in, "I'm not using a full stop anymore. Period."
"Mo-fo"
"Butt"
"Dude" (Once upon a time, only Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles, or Bill & Ted spoke like that in my world)
"Mofo"
"Ain't"
"Freakin'" and "Friggin'" (occasionally I don't feel like swearing...)
"Awesome"
"For sure"

I'm sure I'll point out more as I catch myself using them.

Perhaps I'm trying to convert to Americanism???

(Just kidding - I'm still proud to be Scottish. Remember January's Guide to Scottishness???)

19 comments:

  1. Man, the list o' Americanisms you've picked up basically constitutes like 75% of my common vernacular. Yikes. (With the exceptions of "butt" and "ain't" -- they don't totally fit into my California laid-back she-bro discourse...)

    I'm always a bit annoyed when I say or hear other people constantly throwing in "obviously" and "basically," because unless what you're saying is obvious or basic, it kind of comes off as insulting. But I'll admit, I probably just picked up that perspective from years of high school debate in which pretentious jackasses liberally sprinkled obtuse philosophical tangents with heavily weighted "obviously"s and "basically"s the the express purpose of condescending to listeners who weren't familiar with the concepts. Jerkwards.

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  2. I used the word 'dude' in a text yesterday, then made fun of myself for it. I blame L.A. Ink - Kat Von D uses 'dude' a lot.

    I picked up 'No worries' from somewhere awhile ago... no wonder the occasional inebriated pub customer thought I was an Aussie.

    Mofo is acceptable. We can't go around cussing like Samuel Motherfuck-in' L. Jackson, after all!

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  3. We're rubbing off on you!

    I have a friend who says, "you know what I mean?" all the time and sometimes I'll say, "yeah, I know what you mean." It pisses him off.

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  4. I swear that in every paper I write for school, I end up repeating one world over and over, because I can't think of any alternatives!

    As for the Americanisms? Freaking awesome!

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  5. I think I've missed out on Americanisms taking over my vocab. I HATE it when girls punctuate every 3rd word with 'like', it makes me cringe.

    "I went to town and like saw this dress and I was like 'should I buy it because its like far too expensive' grrrrrr!!

    I however have an annoying habit that a few people have picked up on recently of saying 'actually' all the time!! I don’t know where its suddenly come from?

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  6. I say "awesome", "totally", "for sure", "for serious", " was all like.." and many others a lot of times. It's like a bad habit :P

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  7. I find words from across the pond make their way into my vocab over here as well such as "wanker", "arse" and "I'll brain you", but the last one comes from my Scottish gran mostly.

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  8. I just got flash forward, gonna start watching it soon.

    I say anyway, waaaaay to much. I been doing it for years and it is so annoying

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  9. :o) My fave slang is init although not very american I know people always make fun of me when I say init!

    Still love your blog hunni keep up the crazyyyynesss!!! xxx

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  10. I have the same problem but in reverse.... I'm Canadian and I work with a bunch of brits and Swedes and I'm picking up on their slang... my buddy's point it out when we're at the bar and I call one of them a "Wanker"

    too funny!

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  11. As an American, I'm going to apologize for you picking up the word 'dude'...it's so 80s/90s.

    I'm guilty of using 'freakin', but ain't? Hmmm....never thought if I used that one a lot.

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  12. Americanisms invade your brain and don't let you think of anything else :P I studied BrE (British English...RP) all my life and in six months, my attempt to sound European died...sigh. I decided that since no one is able to tell where I'm from through my accent, I created my own accent and I will always sound like myself anyways...

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  13. I hate to admit but the phrase i sue the most is " No worries".

    Very typically Australian of me, but there you have it...

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  14. i'm with on 'like'. These little habits are waaay to easy to start, and much to hard to stop!

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  15. The worst is if you ever listen to yourself on video or audio tape. My vocab is far less impressive that I ever thought.

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  16. Funny
    Just dont start carrying a fanny pack

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  17. Hmm... I basically say all those americanisms. Should I feel guilty, seeing how I live in YOUR side of the pond?

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  18. I'm so Americanised too, and some of my friends find this amusing! I use 'ass' a lot, even to the point of 'dumbass', 'jackass', 'jeez!', but then my American friends laugh when I do my very British, 'Oh, pants!' They think it's hilarious.

    I'm from Wales, but with an English accent, and nobody has ever guessed correctly just where I'm from. But here in South Wales, the accent isn't very nice - if you haven't heard of rap group Goldie Lookin' Chain and you want to know what people in my city generally sound like, search for it -_-

    Am about to check out your Guide to Scottishness! :D

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  19. I am so guilty of saying "AWESOME". It is sad, really. :)

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